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World AIDS Day: A Commemoration

by Carmen Marguia

World AIDS Day, December 1, is commemorated around the globe with news and events to highlight progress made in the battle against the epidemic, while at the same time reminding people how much still needs to be done. The Red Ribbon is the international symbol of HIV and AIDS awareness. It stands for care and concern for those who are living, those who are ill, those who have died, and those who care for people with HIV and AIDS; it stands for hope, and it stands for support. Anyone can wear a Red Ribbon. You don’t have to be gay, or HIV positive, or living with AIDS to demonstrate that you have an understanding of the issues surrounding HIV and AIDS. The Red Ribbon project is a grass-roots effort. There is no “official” Red Ribbon. You can make your own to wear.


It is the eve of World AIDS Day, December 1. And as I write this, I wonder how many of my Latino sisters and brothers in Milwaukee, in Wisconsin, in the United States, and throughout Latin America and Spain are living with AIDS and HIV… and how many have died from AIDS? I wonder how many are alone because of their family’s shame and how many are surrounded by loved ones puffing up their pillows in hospital rooms, at home, making them comfortable, visiting them. And then I ask myself, “When I see a child, a man, or a woman living with AIDs will I make them comfortable or will I shy away in fear?” I am reminded I have a lot to be grateful for, especially my health, as I take a look at the world around me. Riverwest Currents – Volume 1 – Issue 11 – December 2002
by Carmen Marguia